Audio Files for Graded Readers

This topic contains 5 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Rick Nobleman 1 month, 1 week ago.

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  • #1903

    sjk78
    Participant
      Rank: DAYBREAK

      Hi Andrew,

      Really enjoying the graded Kanji reading sets, thanks so much for making them, it must have taken an enormous amount of work.

      I did have one idea/suggestion. Maybe it would be going a bit beyond your intention behind this series, namely, improving the learner’s reading ability in a sequential manner, but I was wondering whether you have thought about creating audio files to accompany the graded reading books? I was thinking of just the Japanese sentences being read out (without the English translations) by native Japanese speakers with a pause between the sentence so that the listener can grasp the sentence and repeat it out loud if they wish. That way, the learner could incrementally improve their listening comprehension at the same time as their reading comprehension and further fix the kanji and related vocabulary in their memories.

      Stephen

    • #1904

      asc349
      Keymaster
        Rank: SPECTRUM

        Hi Stephen,

        Thanks for this great suggestion! I have copied it to my list of suggested improvements. I would love to offer the audio.

        A couple of barriers that come to mind are the data limitations on the ebooks and of course the cost of making the recordings, assuming there’s no free way to get the audio. Because the exercises are mostly full sentences, it would really require a human to read them properly. Then the file sizes would be enormous given the sheer amount of text in each volume of the series. Still, I like solving problems and am eager to hear suggestions on how this might be achieved.

        I’m glad the reading sets are helping you on your way. Keep in touch and good luck with your studies!
        Andrew

      • #1905

        asc349
        Keymaster
          Rank: SPECTRUM

          Hi Stephen,

          Thanks for this great suggestion! I have copied it to my list of suggested improvements. I would love to offer the audio.

          A couple of barriers that come to mind are the data limitations on the ebooks and of course the cost of making the recordings, assuming there’s no free way to get the audio. Because the exercises are mostly full sentences, it would really require a human to read them properly. Then the file sizes would be enormous given the sheer amount of text in each volume of the series. Still, I like solving problems and am eager to hear suggestions on how this might be achieved.

          I’m glad the reading sets are helping you on your way. Keep in touch and good luck with your studies!
          Andrew

        • #1916

          Rick Nobleman
          Participant
            Rank: LITTLE ONE

            I’m working my way through the KLC now. One of the challenges I’m facing is learning the related vocabulary. I find it hard to learn new words out of context. That’s why the graded readers are so helpful.

            But the graded readers also present a risk. If I read a sentence without having heard a native speaker say it, I could ingrain a bad accent or incorrect intonation. So, I’ll second the request for audio files for the passages in the graded readers.

            This leads me to wonder if I should develop a good level of listening and speaking fluency before even starting to learn the kanji and their vocabulary. That way I can hang them on previously developed aural hooks. It’d be a lot easier to learn the written form of a word that I already know aurally. What do you think?

            Rick

          • #1921

            asc349
            Keymaster
              Rank: SPECTRUM

              Hi Rick,

              Great question. My answer would be 2/3 yes and 1/3 no.

              Yes: Getting pronunciation down cold is a fundamental task and a higher priority than kanji. Also, I recommend folks avoid spending too much time on kanji too early. Studying kanji can be addicting because it’s a very concrete project that you can do effectively on your own and see measurable progress. Which means that many people have a tendency to get their kanji way ahead of the more fundamental aspects of the language.

              No: Kanji themselves are fundamental, in that they are the building blocks for learning vocabulary. Also, a lack of kanji can stop you in your tracks whenever you’re trying to read.

              As far as trying to learn vocab aurally first, my experience is that this is not helpful if the word is a kanji compound. On the contrary, learning compounds tends to go much faster if you know the underlying kanji.

              As long as you’re using the graded reading sets, you should be in good shape as far as keeping your kanji in balance with your knowledge of the other aspects of the language. The reading sets force you to repeatedly practice what you’ve learned, continually reinforcing kana and sentence patterns, and automatically slowing your kanji progress because you need to read a whole set of exercises before moving on to the next kanji.

              I hope these comments are useful to you in some way. Good luck with your studies!

              Andrew

            • #1937

              Rick Nobleman
              Participant
                Rank: LITTLE ONE

                Thanks for your thoughtful reply, Andrew. I agree with all of your points and am finding the KLC and graded reader helpful supplements to my other language learning activities. Thanks so much for creating it!

                Rick

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